1 February 1975 Ultrasonic Power Levels Used In Commercial Equipment For Medical Applications, And How To Control It For Patient's Safety
Author Affiliations +
Proceedings Volume 0047, Application of Optical Instrumentation in Medicine III; (1975); doi: 10.1117/12.954035
Event: Application of Optical Instrumentation in Medicine III, 1974, Kansas City, United States
Abstract
Today's use of ultrasound could be divided in two major areas: the therapeutic and the diagnostic. The major difference between the two applications is the ultrasonic power level at which the equipment operates. In therapeutic applications the systems operate at ultrasonic power levels of up to several watts per square centimeters while the diagnostic equipment operates at power levels of well below 100 milliwatts per square centimeters. The therapeutic equipment is designed to agitate the tissue to the level where thermal heating occurs in the tissue and experimentally has been found to be quite successful in its effects for the treatment of muscular ailments such as lumbago. For diagnostic purposes on the other hand as long as sufficient amount of signal has returned for electronic processing, no additional energy is necessary. Therefore considerably lower ultrasonic power levels are being used.
© (1975) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Janis G. Ziedonis, "Ultrasonic Power Levels Used In Commercial Equipment For Medical Applications, And How To Control It For Patient's Safety", Proc. SPIE 0047, Application of Optical Instrumentation in Medicine III, (1 February 1975); doi: 10.1117/12.954035; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.954035
PROCEEDINGS
2 PAGES


SHARE
KEYWORDS
Ultrasonics

Transducers

Diagnostics

Tissues

Electronics

Safety

Ultrasonography

RELATED CONTENT

Signal Processing In Ultrasound
Proceedings of SPIE (June 19 1979)
Clinical perspective of diagnostic ultrasound
Proceedings of SPIE (June 21 1999)
Discussion Following Panelists' Opening Remarks
Proceedings of SPIE (February 01 1975)
Pulse-Echo Transducer Standardization
Proceedings of SPIE (December 27 1977)
Ultrasonic medical imaging: past, current, and future
Proceedings of SPIE (April 12 2005)

Back to Top