29 December 1977 Wide-Angle Integral Photography - The Integram System
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Abstract
A technique has been designed, developed, and implemented on a semi-routine basis, whereby the major hindrance of Lippmann's elegant concept of integral photography is circumvented without trade-offs, owing chiefly to a novel method of conversion from pseudo-scopic negative to orthoscopic positive, involving a single integral network, without recourse to additional conventional or holographic optics. The Integram* system retains the originally intended full parallax, with very wide acceptance and viewing solid angles; only ordinary incoherent natural or artificial light is used at all stages. The three-dimensional, autostereoscopic, orthoscopic and orthostereoscopic summation image is generated at a 1/1 scale, in full natural colors, and is viewed by transmitted or ambient illumination; it may also be enlarged or reduced without distortions. Angles of over 80° have been achieved in the current 11 x 14 inch samples, where the refractive index of the polyester resin spherilenticulated viewing screens is 1.56. The background, the optics, the technology, proposed refinements, variations and applications of the Integram system are discussed.
© (1977) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Roger L. de Montebello, Roger L. de Montebello, } "Wide-Angle Integral Photography - The Integram System", Proc. SPIE 0120, Three-Dimensional Imaging, (29 December 1977); doi: 10.1117/12.955736; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.955736
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