21 October 1986 Assembly And Alignment Of The Technology Mirror Assembly
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Proceedings Volume 0640, Grazing Incidence Optics; (1986) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.964369
Event: 1986 Technical Symposium Southeast, 1986, Orlando, United States
Abstract
The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), a NASA project scheduled for launch in the 1990s, is a nested set of six Wolter Type I, x-ray telescopes with a 1.2 meter aperture, and associated scientific instruments. AXAF will perform up to two orders of magnitude better than the highly successful High Energy Astrophysics Observatory (HEAO-II), or the Einstein Observatory, in terms of resolution and effective area. To achieve this goal, the specification on the mirror figure quality must be up to approximately ten times more stringent than that for the HEAO-II. To demonstrate that such high figure quality could be achieved, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) undertook the Technology Mirror Assembly (TMA) project. This paper is a summary of the assembly and alignment techniques that were successfully used on the TMA.
© (1986) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Nicholas A. De Filippis, Nicholas A. De Filippis, Paul Glenn, Paul Glenn, Raymond Cahill, Raymond Cahill, "Assembly And Alignment Of The Technology Mirror Assembly", Proc. SPIE 0640, Grazing Incidence Optics, (21 October 1986); doi: 10.1117/12.964369; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.964369
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