3 June 1987 Mirror Deformations Due To Thermal Expansion Of Inserts Bonded To Glass
Author Affiliations +
Proceedings Volume 0748, Structural Mechanics of Optical Systems II; (1987); doi: 10.1117/12.939832
Event: OE LASE'87 and EO Imaging Symposium, 1987, Los Angeles, CA, United States
The support of mirrors often requires bonding inserts into holes in the mirror material. Temperature change and shrinkage of the bonding material and temperature change of the insert produce stresses that deform the optical surface. Using both classical analytical methods and finite element techniques the deformation of plates and shells due to temperature and shrinkage effects are computed. The depth of the hole can be chosen to minimize the deflection of the optical surface. A variety of geometries which include hole diameters both large and small compared to the plate thickness are studied. In addition to the general formulation of the problem, some quantitative results for the Keck Observatory Ten Meter Telescope mirror segments are presented.
© (1987) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Bijan Iraninejad, Jacob Lubliner, Terry Mast, Jerry Nelson, "Mirror Deformations Due To Thermal Expansion Of Inserts Bonded To Glass", Proc. SPIE 0748, Structural Mechanics of Optical Systems II, (3 June 1987); doi: 10.1117/12.939832; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.939832



Keck Observatory

Image segmentation


Temperature metrology



An analytic model for the study of the impact of...
Proceedings of SPIE (September 16 2004)
Adaptive optics developments at Keck Observatory
Proceedings of SPIE (October 25 2004)
Seeing And The Design And Location Of A 15 Meter...
Proceedings of SPIE (November 04 1982)
Accomodating CTE discontinuities in a ULE mosaic mirror
Proceedings of SPIE (July 01 1990)
Adaptive secondary mirror developments at UCL
Proceedings of SPIE (July 07 2000)
Diffraction halo by a segmented telescope
Proceedings of SPIE (July 10 2008)

Back to Top