31 October 2016 Measuring blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries using photoacoustic microscopy
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Abstract
Heart pumps blood through the blood vessels to provide body with oxygen and nutrients. As the result, the blood flow, volume and oxygenation in arteries has a pulsatile nature. Measuring these pulsatile parameters enables more precise monitoring of oxygen metabolic rate and is thus valuable for researches and clinical applications. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a proven label-free method for in vivo measuring blood oxygenation at single blood vessel level. However, studies using PAM to observe the pulsatile nature of blood oxygenation in arteries were not reported. In this paper, we use optical-resolution PAM (OR-PAM) technology to study the blood oxygenation dynamics of pulsatile arteries. First, the ability of our OR-PAM system to accurately reflect the change of optical absorption in imaged objects is demonstrated in a phantom study. Then the system is used to image exposed cortical blood vessels of cat. The pulsatile nature of blood volume and oxygenation in arteries is clearly reflected in photoacoustic (PA) signals, whereas it’s not observable in veins. By using a multi-wavelength laser, the dynamics of the blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries in cardiac cycles can be measured, based on the spectroscopic method.
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Qian Li, Tianhao Yu, Lin Li, Xinyu Chai, Chuanqing Zhou, "Measuring blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries using photoacoustic microscopy", Proc. SPIE 10024, Optics in Health Care and Biomedical Optics VII, 100242E (31 October 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2245686; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2245686
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