28 September 2016 The effect of electromagnetic radiation of wireless connections on morphology of amniotic fluid
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Proceedings Volume 10031, Photonics Applications in Astronomy, Communications, Industry, and High-Energy Physics Experiments 2016; 100313B (2016) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2249320
Event: Photonics Applications in Astronomy, Communications, Industry, and High-Energy Physics Experiments 2016, 2016, Wilga, Poland
Abstract
The article considers the effect of wireless networks on the morphology of amniotic fluid (AF) to demonstrate possible risks involving pregnant women. The analysis of AF thesiograms after exposure of the model fluid to Wi-Fi, 3G and β- radiation was chosen as the research method. A comparative analysis of facies structures is carried out, and depth maps of the facies structure are created. This comparative analysis permits an evaluation of the efficiency of morphological changes. It is shown that AF control facies differ in the concentration of areas with a narrow peripheral area and ellipsoidal formations of crystalloids in circumferences center. After exposure of different types of radiation onto AF, the facies structures collapse and form their own conglomerates. The obtained results show that the considered types of radiation have a negative effect on AF.
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Vsevolod O. Novikov, Natalia Titova, Olexand Azarhov, Waldemar Wójcik, Żaklin Grądz, Assel Mussabekova, "The effect of electromagnetic radiation of wireless connections on morphology of amniotic fluid ", Proc. SPIE 10031, Photonics Applications in Astronomy, Communications, Industry, and High-Energy Physics Experiments 2016, 100313B (28 September 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2249320; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2249320
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