12 June 2017 Plasmonics and metamaterials based super-resolution imaging (Conference Presentation)
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Proceedings Volume 10194, Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications IX; 101940M (2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2263385
Event: SPIE Defense + Security, 2017, Anaheim, California, United States
Abstract
In recent years, surface imaging of various biological dynamics and biomechanical phenomena has seen a surge of interest. Imaging of processes such as exocytosis and kinesin motion are most effective when depth is limited to a very thin region of interest at the edge of the cell or specimen. However, many objects and processes of interest are of size scales below the diffraction limit for safe, visible wavelength illumination. Super-resolution imaging methods such as structured illumination microscopy and others have offered various compromises between resolution, imaging speed, and bio-compatibility. In this talk, I will present our most recent progress in plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM) and localized plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (LPSIM), and their applications in bio-imaging. We have achieved wide-field surface imaging with resolution down to 75 nm while maintaining reasonable speed and compatibility with biological specimens. These plasmonic enhanced super resolution techniques offer unique solutions to obtain 50nm spatial resolution and 50 frames per second wide imaging speed at the same time.
Conference Presentation
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Zhaowei Liu, "Plasmonics and metamaterials based super-resolution imaging (Conference Presentation)", Proc. SPIE 10194, Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications IX, 101940M (12 June 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2263385; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2263385
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KEYWORDS
Plasmonics

Super resolution

Microscopy

Image resolution

Metamaterials

Diffraction

Image processing

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