28 March 1990 Front Matter: Volume 10304
Proceedings Volume 10304, Large-Area Chromogenics: Materials and Devices for Transmittance Control; 1030401 (1990) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2283604
Event: Institutes for Advanced Optical Technologies, 1989, Hamburg, Germany
Abstract
This PDF file contains the front matter associated with SPIE Proceedings Volume 10304, including the Title Page, Copyright information, Table of Contents, and Conference Committee listing.

Preface

The concept of the Institutes for Advanced Optical Technologies developed out of SPIE’s desire to foster increased interaction and collaboration among researchers working in emerging optical technologies. The Institutes provide a forum for experts in these areas to analyze and document the state of the art and to point toward future trends and applications. Institute topics are selected for their timeliness as well as for their significance to future progress in the application of optics. Institute organizers invite selected experts to participate as paper contributors and discussion participants. It is intended that the interaction generated by the small-group structure in a retreatlike setting will foster productive discussions that are beyond the scope and possibility of a regular conference format.

Each Institute has two primary objectives: first, that the interactions and dialogue stimulate technical advancement, and second, that the publication of the Institute volume results in an authoritative collection of significant papers covering key topics in the field. While each editor and committee has unique criteria for determining the acceptability of contributions, it is intended that the Institute process itself will establish the worth and appropriateness of the individual contributions. Each contributor is asked to prepare a draft manuscript and circulate it to the other participants in advance of the Institute. The editor/chair organizes an agenda for discussing critical technical issues. The interactions and collegial discussions by the Institute members are the basis for the ensuing Institute volume. The final action of the Institute is to decide the scope of the volume and what material is to be included and what other material is to be added and by whom.

The Institute on Large-Area Chromogenics: Materials and Devices for Transmittance Control, held in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, September 22-24, 1988, addressed technical issues for this emerging technology and the future impacts it might have on society. The interactions and discussions were lively, at times warm, and gave the participants a more comprehensive grasp of the subject. The resultant volume is this authoritative Institute publication emphasizing topics such as photochromic materials, organic and inorganic electrochromic materials, electrochromic devices, and liquid-crystal materials and devices.

Roy F. Potter

General Editor, SPIE Institute for Advanced Optical Technologies

Other publications in the SPIE Institutes for Advanced Optical Technologies series:

Transformations in Optical Signal Processing, William T. Rhodes, James R. Fienup, Bahaa E. A. Saleh, Editors, 1984, SPIE Volume 373 (Out of print)

Optical and Hybrid Computing, Harold H. Szu, Editor, 1987, SPIE Volume 634

Photonics: High Bandwidth Analog Applications, James Chang, Editor, 1987, SPIE Volume 648

Dosimetry of Laser Radiation in Medicine and Biology, Gerhard J. Müller, David H. Sliney, Editors, 1989, Volume IS 5

Photodynamic Therapy, Charles J. Gomer, Editor, Volume IS 6 (To be published Fall 1990)

Automatic Object Recognition, Hatem Nasr, Editor, Volume IS 7 (To be published Fall 1990)

Institute Participants and Authors

Mr. Anoop Agrawal

Donnelly Corporation

414 East 40th Street

Holland, MI 49423-5313

USA

Miss Anne M. Andersson

Chalmers University of Technology

Department of Physics

S-412 96 Gothenburg

Sweden

Dr. Pandurang V. Ashrit

Université de Moncton

Physics Department

Moncton New Brunswick E1A 3E9

Canada

Mr. Naci Basturk

Asulab SA

Research Laboratories of the SMH Group

Passage Max-Meuron 6

CH-2001 Neuchatel

Switzerland

Dr. Friedrich G. Baucke

Schott Glaswerke Zentralbereich Forschung und

Entwicklung Abteilung Elektrochemie

Hattenbergstrasse 10

D-6500 Mainz 1

FRG

Mr. Dave K. Benson

Solar Energy Research Institute

Materials Branch

1617 Cole Boulevard

Golden, CO 80401-3305

USA

Mr. Michael K. Carpenter

General Motors Research Laboratories

Physical Chemistry Department

Warren, MI 48090-9055

USA

Dr. Nori Y. Chu

American Optical Corporation

Precision Products Division

14 Mechanic Street

Southbridge, MA 01550-2555

USA

Dr. Stuart F. Cogan

EIC Laboratories, Inc.

111 Downey Street

Norwood, MA 02062-2612

USA

Mr. Dennis A. Corrigan

General Motors Research Laboratories

Physical Chemistry Department

Warren, MI 48090-9055

USA

Prof. Jesse H. Day

Ohio University

Department of Chemistry

Athens, OH 45701

USA

Mr. F. Decker

IFGW/UNICAMP

P.O. Box 6165

Campinas, SP

Brazil

Dr. Albert Donnadieu

Université des Sciences et

Techniques du Languedoc

Laboratoire de Spectroscopie II

Laboratoire de Spectroscopie UV des Solides/

UA CNRS n 790

Place Eugene Bataillon

F-34060 Montpellier Cedex 1

France

Mr. W. Estrada

Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería

Facultad de Ciencias

P.O. Box 1301

Lima

Peru

Mr. Polycarpos Falaras

Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie

LP15 du CNRS

tour 22. 4 place jussiu

F-75230 Paris Cedex 05

France

Dr. M. Fantini

Universidad Estadual de Campinas

Rua Coelho Neto

13023 Campinas Sao Paulo

Brazil

Mr. Fernand E. Girouard

Université de Moncton

Physics Department

Moncton New Brunswick E1A 3E9

Canada

Prof. Ronald B. Goldner

Tufts University

Electro-Optics Technology Center

Medford, MA 02155

USA

Ms. Annette Gorenstein

IFGW/UNICAMP

Caixa Postal 6165, 13.100

Campinas, Sao Paulo

Brazil

Dr. Claes G. Granqvist

Chalmers University of Technology

Department of Physics

S-412 96 Gothenburg

Sweden

Dr. Joachim Grupp

Port-Roulant 12

CH-2003 Neuchatel

Switzerland

Prof. Terry E. Haas

Tufts University

Electro-Optics Technology Center

Department of Chemistry

Medford, MA 02155

USA

Dr. Hans J. Hoffmann

Schott Glaswerke

Central Research & Development Division

ZFG-1

Hattenbergstrasse 10

D-6500 Mainz

FRG

Prof. Ronald P. Howson

Loughborough University of Technology

Department of Physics

Ashby Road

Loughborough Leicestershire LE11 3TU

UK

Dr. Anne Hugot Le Goff

Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie

LP15 du CNRS

tour 22. 4 place jussiu

F-75230 Paris Cedex 05

France

Mr. Hiroshi Inaba

Central Glass Company, Ltd.

Central Glass Technical Center

1510, Ohguchi-cho, Matsuzaka

Mie-ken 515

Japan

Mr. Olle Inganas

University of Linkoping

Laboratory of Applied Physics

Department of Physics and Measurement Technology

S-581 83 Linkoping

Sweden

Ms. Suzanne Joiret

Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie

LP15 du CNRS

tour 22. 4 place jussiu

F-75230 Paris Cedex 05

France

Mr. Gordon V. Jorgenson

Honeywell, Inc.

Systems Research Center

MS 65-2600

3660 Technology Drive

Minneapolis, MN 55418-1006

USA

Mr. Tadatoshi Kamimori

Asahi Glass Company, Ltd.

1150 Hazawa-cho, Kanagawa-ku

Yokohama 221

Japan

Mr. Takao Kase

Nissan Motor Company, Ltd.

Central Glass Technical Center

1 Natsushima-cho

Yokosuka 237

Japan

Mr. Hideo Kawahara

8-2-312 Makiochi 5 Chome

Mino City, Osaka 562

Japan

Mr. K. A. Khan

University of Rajshahi

Department of Applied Physics and Electronics

Rajshahi

Bangladesh

Mr. Michihiko Kitao

Shizuoka University

Research Institute of Electronics

Johoku 3-5-1

Hamamatsu 432

Japan

Dr. Carl M. Lampert

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

Applied Science Division

MS/62-203

1 Cyclotron Road

Berkeley, CA 94720

USA

Mr. James C. Lee

Honeywell, Inc.

Systems and Research Center

MS MN 17-2345

P.O. Box 1361

Minneapolis, MN 55440-1361

USA

Mr. E. Leja

Academy of Mining & Metallurgy

Physics and Electron Technology Department

al. Mickiewicza 30

30-059 Cracow

Poland

Dr. Niall R. Lynam

248 Foxdown Road

Holland, MI 49424-2789

USA

Dr. Konstanty W. Marszalek

University of Wuppertal

Department of Electrical Engineering

Fuhlrottstr. 10

5600 Wuppertal 1

FRG

Mr. M. J. Marszalek

Institute of Nuclear Physics

Radzikowskiego 152

PL-31 342 Cracow

Poland

Dr. Masao Misonou

Nippon Sheet Glass Company, Ltd.

Central Research Laboratories

Konoike, Itami

Hyogo 664

Japan

Mr. Takeshi Miyamoto

Nissan Motor Company, Ltd.

Central Glass Technical Center

1 Natsushima-cho

Yokosuka 237

Japan

Dr. Mamoru Mizuhashi

Asahi Glass Company, Ltd.

R & D Center

1150 Hazawa-ChoKangawa-Ku

Yokohama 221

Japan

Dr. G. P. Montgomery, Jr.

General Motors Corporation

Research Laboratories

Physics Department

30500 Mound Road

Warren, MI 48090-9055

USA

Mr. Junichi Nagai

Asahi Glass Company, Ltd.

Advanced Glass R&D Center

1150 Hazawa-cho

Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama 221

Japan

Mr. Kiyoshi Nakase

Central Glass Company, Ltd.

Central Glass Technical Center

1510, Ohguchi-cho, Matsuzaka

Mie-ken 515

Japan

Mr. Yasuhiko Ohsawa

Nissan Motor Company, Ltd.

Central Glass Technical Center

1 Natsushima-cho

Yokosuka 237

Japan

Dr. Roy F. Potter

SPIE

P.O. Box 10

Bellingham, WA 98227-0010

USA

Dr. Jean-Paul Randin

Asulab SA

Research Laboratories of the SMH Group

Passage Max-Meuron 6

CH-2001 Neuchatel

Switzerland

Dr. R. D. Rauh

EIC Laboratories., Inc.

111 Downey Street

Norwood, MA 02062-2612

USA

Mr. Steven E. Selkowitz

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

Building 62 Room 235

1 Cyclotron Road

Berkeley, CA 94720

USA

Dr. Tomasz Stapinski

Academy of Mining & Metallurgy

Physics and Electron Technology Department

al. Mickiewicza 30

PL-30 059 Cracow

Poland

Mr. James R. Stevens

University of Guelph

Physics Department

Guelph Ontario NIG 2W1

Canada

Mr. J. S. Svensson

Chalmers University of Technology

FYSIK

S-41296 Gothenburg

Sweden

Mr. Hiroaki Tada

Nippon Sheet Glass Company, Ltd.

Central Research Laboratory

1, Kaidoshita Kounoike

Itami 664

Japan

Prof. Vo-Van Truong

Université de Moncton

Department of Physics

New Brunswick El A 3E9

Canada

Prof. Roger D. Willett

Washington State University

Department of Chemistry

Pullman, WA 99164-4630

USA

Dr. Shoji Yamada

Shizuoka University

Research Institute of Electronics

Johoku 3-5-1

Hamamatsu 432

Japan

Prof. Sze C. Yang

University of Rhode Island

Pastore Chemical Laboratory

Department of Chemistry

Kingston, RI 02881-0801

USA

Mr. Teruko Yoshimoto

Nissan Motor Company, Ltd.

Central Glass Technical Center

1 Natsushima-cho

Yokosuka 237

Japan

Introduction

Chromogenic materials can alter their optical properties in a persistent yet reversible manner when subjected to a change in external conditions such as irradiation intensity, temperature, or electric-field strength. The most well-known chromogenic devices are probably photochromic sunglasses, which color in the sun and bleach in the dark. In the future, chromogenic materials may be used on a large scale to regulate the throughput of radiant energy for windows in buildings and cars, so that comfortable lighting and temperature are maintained without excessive air conditioning. Chromogenic materials can also be used in variable reflectance mirrors, in displays (such as road signs), and so forth. Traditionally, chromogenics has not been viewed as a self-contained subject for study. However, for some years it has been the opinion of the editors of this book that the time has come for a change, and that both the interrelations between the different materials enabling variable optical properties and the similarities between their potential applications warrant a unified approach to chromogenics. This is the first book on the subject. Many people have contributed, which in itself is a manifestation of the fact that the importance of chromogenic studies is becoming widely recognized.

The first idea that a book should be written on large-area chromogenics—even though the term had not yet been coined—materialized in June 1985. Concrete plans for such a book were made in 1988, when we approached the newly begun Optical Engineering Press. We asked a number of hand-picked researchers to contribute chapters on various aspects on chromogenics for the book, which was met with enthusiasm. The decisive days for this book were 22-24 September 1988—immediately following a topical conference in Hamburg, Germany, on Optical Materials Technology for Energy Efficiency and Solar Energy Utilization—when many of the contributors met in a quiet German hotel. Those were days filled with scientific discussions and culinary extravagances in an atmosphere that was inspiring indeed. Without exception, we seemed to be filled with zeal and a feeling that we were about to embark on a project of lasting importance.

The ambitious goal of this book is to give a broad coverage of all aspects of chromogenics. This is of course impossible to accomplish, and whether we have come close or not is up to the reader to judge. We are aware of some unfortunate omissions in the text, the most apparent perhaps being the lack of a detailed discussion of polaron absorption in amorphous electrochromic materials. Further, we are concerned that some relevant research conducted in Eastern Europe and certain Third World countries has not been given due consideration.

During the completion of this book we were informed of the death (22 February 1989) of one of the contributors, Professor Jesse H. Day of Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. His contribution to this book, we regret to say, is his last scientific paper. We are grateful to Professor Roger Willett of Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, who rewrote and expanded Professor Day’s original draft chapter.

We wish to thank all of you who contributed for your kind cooperation and unfailing support, and for lessening the editors’ burden by submitting your papers promptly. Without all of your efforts, this book would not exist. Special thanks go to Roy Potter of SPIE, who inspired and supported us from the beginning of this project. To all others who have helped us to bring this book to completion, we owe our deepest appreciation.

Carl M. Lampert

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (USA)

Claes G. Granqvist

Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

© (1990) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
} "Front Matter: Volume 10304", Proc. SPIE 10304, Large-Area Chromogenics: Materials and Devices for Transmittance Control, 1030401 (28 March 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.2283604; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2283604
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