28 March 1990 Fundamentals of electrochromism in metal oxide bronzes
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Proceedings Volume 10304, Large-Area Chromogenics: Materials and Devices for Transmittance Control; 103040A (1990) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2283613
Event: Institutes for Advanced Optical Technologies, 1989, Hamburg, Germany
Abstract
Electrochromism can be generally defined as the phenomenon of color change brought about by the passage of an electric current. The current causes a chemical change, an oxidation or reduction reaction. Such a general definition covers a good deal wider range of substances than is usually understood by the term "electrochromisrn". Under this definition any color change accompanying an oxidation/reduction reaction, one of the most common reaction types in chemistry, could be said to be electrochromic. As the term is commonly used, one of the states (oxidized or reduced) is typically colorless, thus the process of producing the colored state is "electrochromic" or "chromogenic". If the reduced state is colorless and color appears upon oxidation, the material is said to undergo "anodic coloration". If the oxidized state is colorless, color appears upon reduction and it is "cathodic coloration". A moment's reflection will reveal that if a material has an absorption in, let us say, the UV in its reduced form, and an absorption in the visible in its oxidized form, then it is "anodically coloring" in the visible, but "cathodically coloring" in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum. We will continue to use the terms "cathodically coloring" and "anodically coloring" because it is convenient to do so, and the usage is widespread in the literature, but it should be borne in mind that these are limited concepts in a general sense.
© (1990) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Terry E. Haas, "Fundamentals of electrochromism in metal oxide bronzes", Proc. SPIE 10304, Large-Area Chromogenics: Materials and Devices for Transmittance Control, 103040A (28 March 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.2283613; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2283613
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