20 February 2017 A high sensitivity 20Mfps CMOS image sensor with readout speed of 1Tpixel/sec for visualization of ultra-high speed phenomena
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Proceedings Volume 10328, Selected Papers from the 31st International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics; 1032802 (2017) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2270787
Event: 31st International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics, 2016, Osaka, Japan
Abstract
Ultra-high speed (UHS) CMOS image sensors with on-chop analog memories placed on the periphery of pixel array for the visualization of UHS phenomena are overviewed in this paper. The developed UHS CMOS image sensors consist of 400H×256V pixels and 128 memories/pixel, and the readout speed of 1Tpixel/sec is obtained, leading to 10 Mfps full resolution video capturing with consecutive 128 frames, and 20 Mfps half resolution video capturing with consecutive 256 frames. The first development model has been employed in the high speed video camera and put in practical use in 2012. By the development of dedicated process technologies, photosensitivity improvement and power consumption reduction were simultaneously achieved, and the performance improved version has been utilized in the commercialized high-speed video camera since 2015 that offers 10 Mfps with ISO16,000 photosensitivity. Due to the improved photosensitivity, clear images can be captured and analyzed even under low light condition, such as under a microscope as well as capturing of UHS light emission phenomena.
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R. Kuroda, R. Kuroda, S. Sugawa, S. Sugawa, } "A high sensitivity 20Mfps CMOS image sensor with readout speed of 1Tpixel/sec for visualization of ultra-high speed phenomena", Proc. SPIE 10328, Selected Papers from the 31st International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics, 1032802 (20 February 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2270787; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2270787
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