30 August 2017 Camera characterization for all-sky polarization measurements during the 2017 solar eclipse
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Abstract
A solar eclipse provides a rare opportunity to observe skylight polarization during conditions that are fundamentally different than what we see every day. On 21 August 2017 we will measure the skylight polarization during a total solar eclipse in Rexburg, Idaho, USA. Previous research has shown that during totality the sky polarization pattern is altered significantly to become nominally symmetric about the zenith. However, there are still questions remaining about the details of how surface reflectance near the eclipse observation site and optical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere influence the totality sky polarization pattern. We will study how skylight polarization in a solar eclipse changes through each phase and how surface and atmospheric features affect the measured polarization signatures. To accomplish this, fully characterizing the cameras and fisheye lenses is critical. This paper reports measurements that include finding the camera sensitivity and its relationship to the required short exposure times, measuring the camera’s spectral response function, mapping the angles of each camera pixel with the fisheye lens, and taking test measurements during daytime and twilight conditions. The daytime polarimetric images were compared to images from an existing all-sky polarization imager and a polarimetric radiative transfer model.
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Taiga Hashimoto, Laura M. Dahl, Seth A. Laurie, Joseph A. Shaw, "Camera characterization for all-sky polarization measurements during the 2017 solar eclipse", Proc. SPIE 10407, Polarization Science and Remote Sensing VIII, 1040706 (30 August 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2274490; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2274490
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