9 March 2018 Use of silicon photomultipliers for detection of Cherenkov light from Compton scattered electrons for medical imaging
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Abstract
Radioactive isotopes with energies up to 0.5 MeV are used in nuclear medicine for imaging. However several isotopes with energies up to 10 MeV exist that have interesting properties for medical applications, but conventional detectors are inefficient for these energies. A Compton camera setup, consisting of a radiator and an absorption layer, can be used to detect such high energy gamma radiation. In a Compton camera an incident gamma ray undergoes a Compton scattering in the radiator creating a high energetic Compton electron e. By determining the point of interaction and measuring the energy and the direction of the scattered gamma ray it is possible to confine the origin of the incident gamma ray to the surface of a cone. The greatest challenge lies in the coincident detection of electron and scattered gamma. Previous research proposed the use of Silicon Photomultipliers arrays (SiPM) to detect Cherenkov Light (CL) produced by e for determining es properties based on the directional properties of CL. Since only few photons of CL are produced, the high noise floor of the SiPM affects the detection negatively. In this contribution an estimation of SiPMs noise floor is presented, that bases on a behavioural simulation of noise processes in the SiPM. With the simulation it is possible to determine properties of the SiPM, to assess the effectiveness of filter and to build stimuli for other simulations.
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Matthias Mielke, Matthias Mielke, Reimund Bayerlein, Reimund Bayerlein, Christian Gibas, Christian Gibas, Rainer Brück, Rainer Brück, Ivor Fleck, Ivor Fleck, } "Use of silicon photomultipliers for detection of Cherenkov light from Compton scattered electrons for medical imaging", Proc. SPIE 10573, Medical Imaging 2018: Physics of Medical Imaging, 105732M (9 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2294947; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2294947
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