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14 September 2018 Ultrafast multi-terahertz probes of symmetry breaking in a stripe-phase correlated oxide
G. Coslovich, B. Huber, S. Behl, A. F. Kemper, T. Sasagawa, H. A. Bechtel, M. C. Martin, R. A. Kaindl
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Abstract
The application of transient terahertz (THz) pulses to excite and probe low-energy quantum and collective excitations in materials represents a powerful tool to study both intrinsic interactions and non-equilibrium phases. In the following, we discuss ultrafast multi-THz studies that resolve the dynamics of electronic itineracy and vibrational symmetries in a strongly-correlated nickelate. Many transition-metal oxides exhibit the emergence of “stripes,” corresponding to quasione- dimensional charge, spin and lattice modulations as a manifestation of strong correlations. In our experiments, optical excitation of a stripe-phase nickel oxide triggers the rapid melting of its atomic-scale charge order and results in dynamics that yields insight into the couplings underlying the stripes. The transient optical conductivity is sensitive to both charges and in-plane vibrations and reveals a succession of ultrafast processes, ranging from rapid delocalization and localization of charges, via a time-delayed reaction of vibrational distortions to the electronic quench, up to the multi-picosecond re-establishment of the symmetry-broken phase.
© (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
G. Coslovich, B. Huber, S. Behl, A. F. Kemper, T. Sasagawa, H. A. Bechtel, M. C. Martin, and R. A. Kaindl "Ultrafast multi-terahertz probes of symmetry breaking in a stripe-phase correlated oxide ", Proc. SPIE 10756, Terahertz Emitters, Receivers, and Applications IX, 107560K (14 September 2018); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2322682
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KEYWORDS
Terahertz radiation

Picosecond phenomena

Ultrafast phenomena

Oxides

Mid-IR

Spectroscopy

Physics

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