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25 September 2018 High-resolution charge domain TDI-CMOS image sensor for Earth observation
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Abstract
Earth observation (EO) is a rapidly expanding area of space science and technology, fueled by the demands for timely, comprehensive and informative data for an increasing number of applications. With the increased affordability of satellites EO is becoming accessible to a larger pool of commercial developers and users. Presently there does not exist in the market a low cost payload with the performance required to meet the growing demands of the commercial ‘New Space’ EO market (very high resolution, good quality image, low mass and low recurrent cost). The presentation will discuss the characterization results of a novel TDI-CMOS silicon prototype as well as a description of the current flight model design currently being developed under the CEOI EO technology and Instrumentation program funded by the UK Space Agency. This sensor will be a key enabling technology for the high resolution new space payload.
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© (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Jérôme Pratlong, Georgios Tsiolis, Hyun Jung Lee, Vincent Arkesteijn, and Paul Donegan "High-resolution charge domain TDI-CMOS image sensor for Earth observation", Proc. SPIE 10785, Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XXII, 107850X (25 September 2018); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2326778
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