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28 February 2019 The contrast of demineralization on tooth occlusal surfaces from 405 to 1950-nm with varying depth
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Proceedings Volume 10857, Lasers in Dentistry XXV; 108570O (2019) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2512941
Event: SPIE BiOS, 2019, San Francisco, California, United States
Abstract
Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) is a new imaging technology that detects dental caries (decay) on tooth occlusal surfaces and in the interproximal contact sites between teeth. Conventional techniques, mostly dental x-rays, do not provide the high sensitivity and specificity at the vulnerable pits and fissure regions. The contrast of demineralization on tooth surfaces changes with increasing severity and the magnitude of that change with depth depends on the wavelength. The purpose of this study is to determine how the contrast changes with depth as a function of wavelength. Demineralization of varying depth was produced in 1.5 × 1.5 mm exposed windows after 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days of exposure to a demineralizing solution at pH 4.5. Lesions were imaged at 405, 630, 850, 1300, 1460, 1535, 1675, and 1950-nm with multiple imaging systems. The highest lesion contrast was measured at 1950-nm.
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Niloufar Mohajerani, Kenneth H. Chan, Vincent B. Yang, Daniel Fried, and Cynthia L. Darling "The contrast of demineralization on tooth occlusal surfaces from 405 to 1950-nm with varying depth", Proc. SPIE 10857, Lasers in Dentistry XXV, 108570O (28 February 2019); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2512941
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