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3 June 2019 Citrate-reduced Au nanoparticles vs. monodisperse spheres: extinction and dynamic light scattering measurements
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Proceedings Volume 11067, Saratov Fall Meeting 2018: Computations and Data Analysis: from Nanoscale Tools to Brain Functions; 1106717 (2019) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2522506
Event: International Symposium on Optics and Biophotonics VI: Saratov Fall Meeting 2018, 2018, Saratov, Russian Federation
Abstract
The most common protocol for the synthesis of Au nanospheres is the reduction of gold salts by sodium citrate. However, the particles obtained by this method are not quite perfectly spherical and their optical and physical properties suffer from polydispersity and nonuniformity. In this work, we synthesized sets of quasispherical Au nanoparticles with sizes from 20 to 70 nm by citrate-based methods as well as single-crystal Au nanospheres with uniform diameters ranging from 20 to 130 nm. Particles were characterized by TEM, UV-VIS and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). We found that the extinction spectra of monodisperse Au nanospheres are equal to those calculated by using Mie theory (both in the position and width of the plasmonic band). The deviation of shape from a sphere that is typical of citratestabilized nanoparticles leads to a significant departure of the optical properties from those predicted by Mie theory. The non-sphericity of these particles also affects the measurement of their size by DLS. In particular, citrate-stabilized nanoparticles display a bimodal size distribution associated to rotational diffusion.
© (2019) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Andrey M. Burov, Boris N. Khlebtsov, Fulvio Ratto, and Nikolay G. Khlebtsov "Citrate-reduced Au nanoparticles vs. monodisperse spheres: extinction and dynamic light scattering measurements", Proc. SPIE 11067, Saratov Fall Meeting 2018: Computations and Data Analysis: from Nanoscale Tools to Brain Functions, 1106717 (3 June 2019); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2522506
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