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27 April 2020 Detection and automated monitoring of oil on the ocean surface (Conference Presentation)
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Abstract
Timely response to an oil spill requires continuous areal monitoring of the ocean surface around oil facilities. Polaris Sensor Technologies has tested the Pyxis uncooled microbolometer-based polarimetric camera at the Department of Interior’s Ohmsett test facility for oil spill response over the last several years and has demonstrated excellent performance of detection of multiple types of crude oil, diesel, and kerosene in still water, in waves, during the day and overnight, and even showed strong detection of emulsified oil in waves. Further testing in the Gulf of Mexico and at the Santa Barbara seeps has also been completed. In this paper, we report these test results as well as the Pyxis-based autonomous detection system for continuous monitoring. Finally, we will describe potential operational scenarios, including deployment on fixed, floating, and drone platforms, in which this technology could be exploited for spill recovery operations as well as for automated monitoring.
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© (2020) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
David B. Chenault and Justin P. Vaden "Detection and automated monitoring of oil on the ocean surface (Conference Presentation)", Proc. SPIE 11420, Ocean Sensing and Monitoring XII, 114200K (27 April 2020); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2558720
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