12 June 1990 Color Separation Positives in Sequence on 35mm Continuous Tone, Panchromatic Black and White Microfilm for Low Cost Archiving of Color Images
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Proceedings Volume 1184, Neugebauer Memorial Seminar on Color Reproduction; (1990) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.963903
Event: Neugebauer Memorial SPIE Seminar on Color Reproduction, 1989, Tokyo, Japan
Abstract
Black and white film is widely accepted as being more permanent than color film. Color separations on black and white film are routinely prepared from commercial color motion picture negatives to ensure that valuable film endures. At some point in the future, the separations are reconstructed onto color film and fresh release prints are struck for distribution to theaters. Color separations are rarely made from still color images to enhance their longevity, due in part to the complexity and expense of separating and reconstructing color images. The author has developed hardware and a set of procedures to make and reconstruct color separations at very low cost, and, if warranted, in high volume. Sets of separations are exposed in register sequentially onto sprocketed, continuous tone 35mm panchromatic microfilm. Sets of separations are reconstructed onto common color sheet film or electronic sensors with a registered tri-color viewer/printer that is suitable for use in room light.
© (1990) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Kevin Laurence Warnock, "Color Separation Positives in Sequence on 35mm Continuous Tone, Panchromatic Black and White Microfilm for Low Cost Archiving of Color Images", Proc. SPIE 1184, Neugebauer Memorial Seminar on Color Reproduction, (12 June 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.963903; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.963903
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