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19 March 1990 Epitaxial and As-Grown Preparation of Ba2YCu3Ox Thin Films on Si with Epitaxially Grown ZrO2 as a Buffer Layer
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Proceedings Volume 1187, Processing of Films for High Tc Superconducting Electronics; (1990) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.965148
Event: 1989 Microelectronic Integrated Processing Conferences, 1989, Santa Clara, United States
Abstract
High-Tc superconducting Ba2YCu3Ox thin films have been epitaxially grown on Si(100) substrates with the epitaxially grown Zr02 or yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a buffer layer. The thin films were prepared by rf magnetron sputtering of the stoichiometric Ba2YCu30x target below 700°C. An adequate positive substrate bias was necessary to ensure surface smoothness and to show the superconducting transition above liquid nitrogen temperature without any post-treatment. The highest Tc(onset) and Tc(end) observed were 88K and 84K, respectively. The critical current density was Mx105A/cm2 at 50K. Using the silicon substrates patterned with the trench, the superconducting microbridge junction has been fabricated in as-grown Ba2YCu3Ox thin films by rf-magnetron sputtering. The microbridge junctions with constrictions as small as submicron dimension were obtained. These microbridge junctions behaved as Josephson junction and were observed microwave-induced steps. Based on Likharev's theory, it is suggested that these devices show Josephson effect in the Abrikosov vortex motion region.
© (1990) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Hiroaki Myoren, Yukio Osaka, Yukio Nishiyama, Naokazu Miyamoto, Hirofumi Fukumoto, Hiroyuki Nasu, and Toshihiko Hamasaki "Epitaxial and As-Grown Preparation of Ba2YCu3Ox Thin Films on Si with Epitaxially Grown ZrO2 as a Buffer Layer", Proc. SPIE 1187, Processing of Films for High Tc Superconducting Electronics, (19 March 1990); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.965148
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