1 February 1991 Aesthetic message of holography
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Abstract
Gisele Freund states that every historical epoch has its own artistic modes of expression that reflect the political character. thoughts and tastes of the times ill. At another point she writes that each society creates its own particular modes of expression largely through its life-style and tradition and that these modes in turn reflect the epoch. Every change in society influences the theme and type of artistic representation [2]. If one agrees with Freund's point of view . it becomes necessary to look at holography from a perspective different from those used up to now. We have to ask in which way and using what aesthetic methods and means does holography correspond with the thoughts and tastes of our times or. to put it differently. whether the aesthetic message of the medium is able to influence as well as express the characteristics and trends of the present experience. Above all, it is essential to examine what holography is and how this medium articulates its aesthetic message. This is not intended to be another detailed explanation of the technical principles of the recording and reconstruction of a hologram. which has already been done innumerable times 13]. Of more importance here is the intention to investigate the aesthetic side of the medium.
© (1991) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Peter Zec, "Aesthetic message of holography", Proc. SPIE 1238, Three-Dimensional Holography: Science, Culture, Education, (1 February 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.19362; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.19362
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