1 April 1991 Interactions of laser-induced cavitation bubbles with a rigid boundary
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Proceedings Volume 1358, 19th Intl Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics; (1991) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.23948
Event: 19th International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, 1990, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Abstract
Although the dynamics of cavitation bubbles near rigid boundaries have been widely studied using conventional high-speed photographic and schlieren techniques, no quantitative optical measurements of the pressure changes which arise within the liquid and solid media have previously been reported. In this paper, we present a series of high-speed Mach-Zehnder video interferograms of a Nd:YAG laser-induced cavity in water at a distance of 2.7 mm from a plane PMMA boundary. During the first cycle of oscillation, a maximum cavity radius of 1 mm is attained and a translational motion towards the solid wall is observed during which three complete radial oscillations occur. The asymmetrical build-up of pressure in the surrounding liquid during bubble collapse and the subsequent emission of spherical acoustic transients with peak pressures in the order of 100 bars are related to the initial cavity position and size. By viewing the propagation of these acoustic waves across the rigid boundary and into the PMMA, direct measurements of peak stresses in the bulk solid are made.
© (1991) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Barry Ward, David C. Emmony, "Interactions of laser-induced cavitation bubbles with a rigid boundary", Proc. SPIE 1358, 19th Intl Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, (1 April 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.23948; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.23948
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