1 August 1990 Performance in close range systems
Author Affiliations +
Proceedings Volume 1395, Close-Range Photogrammetry Meets Machine Vision; 13953K (1990) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2294371
Event: Close-Range Photogrammetry Meets Machine Vision, 1990, Zurich, Switzerland
Abstract
The extensions to new fields and the advances in speed and comprehensiveness in currently reported close range photogrammetry have been mainly derived by adaptation of classical methods. Information is extracted from sets of two dimensional recorded "images", often, nowadays, after increasingly sophisticated image processing. The improvement in accuracy and reliability of the resulting information, however extensive the image processing, is still limited by any physical shortcomings in the processing of the incoming photonic signals before and during the recording stage. As better analysis becomes possible, previously adequate techniques for acquisition of data may impose critical limitations. This contribution re-examines some of the fundamental aspects of the physical interactions of alternative photonic systems with object surfaces, optical systems and recording media, in their resulting effects on the resolution, accuracy and reliability of the recorded data and on the information derived from the records. Some examples are included of specific work that has established a basis for a better understanding of some often unsuspected possibilities for improvement of performance. A brief review will be included of current developments related to topics introduced in the author's paper in the Symposium in Stockholm in 1978
© (1990) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
J. W. C. Gates, J. W. C. Gates, } "Performance in close range systems", Proc. SPIE 1395, Close-Range Photogrammetry Meets Machine Vision, 13953K (1 August 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.2294371; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2294371
PROCEEDINGS
7 PAGES


SHARE
RELATED CONTENT

Continuous focusing of moving objects using DFD1F
Proceedings of SPIE (March 10 1994)
Dynamic focus window selection strategy for digital cameras
Proceedings of SPIE (February 22 2005)
Infrared Eye: a human-vision-based display
Proceedings of SPIE (August 15 1999)
Ocular Manipulator For Robotic Vision
Proceedings of SPIE (February 15 1984)

Back to Top