1 June 1992 Laser-induced fluorescence quantitation of choloroaluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate concentration in rat tissue
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Abstract
The determination of photosensitizer concentration in tissue will allow improved planning of photodynamic therapy. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been used to measure fluorescence of drugs in tissue. This study was designed to determine if in-vivo fluorescence intensities could be correlated with tissue concentration of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate in rat tissues. Following LIF measurement, the animals were euthanized and the concentration of AlPcs in different tissues were determined using chemical extraction technique. In-vivo fluorescence intensities were correlated with the extracted AlPcs for several tissues. A linear relationship between concentration and in-vivo fluorescence intensity was found for all tissues examined with correlation coefficient being highest in tissues such as liver, spleen, kidney and tumor. The correlation coefficient in skin, leg muscle and tongue was lower.
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Masoud Panjehpour, Rick E. Sneed, Donita L. Frazier, Mary Ann Barnhill, Sherrie O'Brien, Bill Harb, Bergein F. Overholt, "Laser-induced fluorescence quantitation of choloroaluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate concentration in rat tissue", Proc. SPIE 1645, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Detection: Mechanisms and Techniques in Photodynamic Therapy, (1 June 1992); doi: 10.1117/12.60940; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.60940
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