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27 August 1992 Apparent depth and size of stereoscopically viewed images
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Proceedings Volume 1666, Human Vision, Visual Processing, and Digital Display III; (1992) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.135993
Event: SPIE/IS&T 1992 Symposium on Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology, 1992, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
We analyzed the apparent depth and size of stereoscopic images and verified the results by a psycho-physical experiment. Random dot stereograms containing horizontal disparity (parallax) were displayed field-sequentially on a CRT display, and the apparent depth and size of the image was measured by using two LED's as a matching index. The conclusions derived are: stereoscopic images are larger than the image on the screen when formed behind it and smaller when formed in front. When an image is formed in front of the screen, its apparent depth saturates as a function of parallax, resulting in a decrease in the sensitivity of apparent depth at large values of parallax. Neither is a linear function of disparity between the left and right images on the screen.
© (1992) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Hideo Kusaka "Apparent depth and size of stereoscopically viewed images", Proc. SPIE 1666, Human Vision, Visual Processing, and Digital Display III, (27 August 1992); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.135993
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