2 March 1993 SURPHEXtm: new dry photopolymers for replication of surface relief diffractive optics
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Proceedings Volume 1732, Holographics International '92; (1993); doi: 10.1117/12.140390
Event: Holographics International '92, 1992, London, United Kingdom
Abstract
High efficiency, deep groove, surface relief diffractive optical elements (DOE) with various optical functions can be recorded in a photoresist using conventional interferometric holographic and computer generated photolithographic recording techniques. While photoresist recording media are satisfactory for recording individual surface relief DOE, a reliable and precise method is needed to replicate these diffractive microstructures to maintain the high aspect ratio in each replicated DOE. The term `high aspect ratio' means that the depth of a groove is substantially greater, i.e., 2, 3, or more times greater, then the width of the groove. A new family of dry photopolymers SURPHEXTM was developed recently at Du Pont to replicate such highly efficient, deep groove DOEs. SURPHEXTM photopolymers are being utilized in Du Pont's proprietary dry photopolymer embossing (DPE) technology to replicate with a very high degree of precision almost any type of surface relief DOE. Surfaces relief microstructures with a width/depth aspect ratio of 1:20 (0.1 micrometers /2.0micrometers ) were faithfully replicated by DPE technology. Several types of plastic and glass/quartz optical substrates can be used for economical replication of DOE.
© (1993) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Felix P. Shvartsman, "SURPHEXtm: new dry photopolymers for replication of surface relief diffractive optics", Proc. SPIE 1732, Holographics International '92, (2 March 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.140390; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.140390
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KEYWORDS
Photopolymers

Diffractive optical elements

Holography

Polymers

Ultraviolet radiation

Scanning electron microscopy

Optical components

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