9 December 1992 Multiscale wavelet representations for mammographic feature analysis
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Proceedings Volume 1768, Mathematical Methods in Medical Imaging; (1992); doi: 10.1117/12.130912
Event: San Diego '92, 1992, San Diego, CA, United States
Abstract
This paper introduces a novel approach for accomplishing mammographic feature analysis through multiresolution representations. We show that efficient (nonredundant) representations may be identified from digital mammography and used to enhance specific mammographic features within a continuum of scale space. The multiresolution decomposition of wavelet transforms provides a natural hierarchy in which to embed an interactive paradigm for accomplishing scale space feature analysis. Choosing wavelets (or analyzing functions) that are simultaneously localized in both space and frequency, results in a powerful methodology for image analysis. Multiresolution and orientation selectivity, known biological mechanisms in primate vision, are ingrained in wavelet representations and inspire the techniques presented in this paper. Our approach includes local analysis of complete multiscale representations. Mammograms are reconstructed from wavelet coefficients, enhanced by linear, exponential and constant weight functions localized in scale space. By improving the visualization of breast pathology we can improve the changes of early detection of breast cancers (improve quality) while requiring less time to evaluate mammograms for most patients (lower costs).
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Andrew F. Laine, Shuwu Song, "Multiscale wavelet representations for mammographic feature analysis", Proc. SPIE 1768, Mathematical Methods in Medical Imaging, (9 December 1992); doi: 10.1117/12.130912; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.130912
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KEYWORDS
Wavelets

Wavelet transforms

Mammography

Transform theory

Image enhancement

Breast

Medical imaging

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