9 February 1993 Multidomain WDM network structures for large-scale reconfigurable partitionable parallel computer architecture
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Abstract
Multi-domain wavelength-division multiplexing (M-WDM) is proposed as a generalization of single star-coupled WDM networks. The objective is to provide scalable interconnection schemes for different parallel computer architectures that utilize the multi-channel and tunability characteristics of photonic network devices, given their existing limitations. Device tunability results in reconfigurable and partitionable interconnection. The multi-domain structure results in scalable networks due to the spatial re-use of the available wavelength band. This paper identifies the variables involved in the design of (M-WDM) networks according to arbitrary interconnection schemes. A framework for network specification and parameter trade-off is presented. The introduced network structures are potentially applied to both synchronous and asynchronous parallel computing environments. Topologically reconfigurable architectures are presented for both single-stage and multi-stage (pipelined) parallel machines executing synchronous algorithms. M-WDM structures are compared for distributed shared memory, multiple-instruction multiple-data (MIMD), parallel architectures.
© (1993) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Khaled A. Aly, Patrick W. Dowd, "Multidomain WDM network structures for large-scale reconfigurable partitionable parallel computer architecture", Proc. SPIE 1784, High-Speed Fiber Networks and Channels II, (9 February 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.141073; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.141073
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