1 July 1993 Laser tissue melding: use of 1.32-μm computerized Nd:YAG laser, results of leak/burst strength studies in microsurgical procedures
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Proceedings Volume 1876, Lasers in Otolaryngology, Dermatology, and Tissue Welding; (1993) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.147023
Event: OE/LASE'93: Optics, Electro-Optics, and Laser Applications in Scienceand Engineering, 1993, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Abstract
The ProClosureTM System (PCS) consists of a low power 1.32micrometers Nd:YAG laser coupled to a handheld disposable fiber optic device. The system has been designed to perform a wide range of tissue welding applications such as cosmetic skin closure,vascular surgery, and minimally invasive surgical procedures normally performed with sutures and staples. Utilizing a wavelength for tissue fusion that is least distracted by medium in the surgical field coupled with a computerized delivery system allows for a more precise application (+/- 5%) of laser energy to the tissue. The study design involved the micro-surgical anastomosis of twenty Sprague-Dawley rats (vas deferens) and twenty-one Sprague-Dawley rats (femoral arteries). Each rat is its own contralateral control. Laser repair time is approximately one-third that of conventional suturing. Postoperative dissection and burst strength testing was conducted at day 0, 1, 7, and 14. At each postoperative interval, the mean leak/burst strength for laser-assisted closure v. control, was markedly higher. The precise application of energy fluence resulting from ProClosure's computerized system yields an initial strength and a fluid static seal that is superior to conventional suture closure.
© (1993) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Dallas W. Anderson, Tung Mei Hsu, Steven J. Halpern, Arnold Honaker, "Laser tissue melding: use of 1.32-μm computerized Nd:YAG laser, results of leak/burst strength studies in microsurgical procedures", Proc. SPIE 1876, Lasers in Otolaryngology, Dermatology, and Tissue Welding, (1 July 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.147023; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.147023
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