14 December 1992 Hybrid integration of millimeter wave devices using the epitaxial liftoff (ELO) technique
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Proceedings Volume 1929, 17th International Conference on Infrared and Millimeter Waves; 19295T (1992) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2298326
Event: 17th International Conference on Infrared and Millimeter Waves, 1992, Pasadena, CA, United States
Abstract
With the advent of the ELO techniquel , extremely thin (100A) single crystal films of GaAs or low Al mole fraction (x < 0.4) AlGaAs grown by MBE or MOCVD can be removed from their GaAs substrates and bonded to alternative substrates. This technique utilizes a thin AlAs layer between the epi-films of interest and the GaAs substrate. The high etch selectivity of AlAs over GaAs or low Al mole fraction AlGaAs in 10% hydrofluoric acid is used to completely undercut the films of interest, thus separating them from the GaAs substrate. Through the use of Apiezon W "black" wax as a carrier, the selective etching of these extremely thin films can be facilitated as well as allowing them to be easily manipulated and bonded to alternative substrates without any damage. One of the optimal alternative substrates is silicon which provides the opportunity to integrate III-V devices with silicon devices. Furthermore, the surrogate silicon substrate acts as a better heat sink for GaAs/AlGaAs devices with high power dissipation since silicon has a higher thermal conductivity than GaAs . Alternative quartz substrates also offer special advantages since they are transparent and have a lower dielectric constant than the GaAs substrate.
© (1992) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Andrew J. Tsao, "Hybrid integration of millimeter wave devices using the epitaxial liftoff (ELO) technique", Proc. SPIE 1929, 17th International Conference on Infrared and Millimeter Waves, 19295T (14 December 1992); doi: 10.1117/12.2298326; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2298326
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