15 November 1993 Ocean background model for scene simulation
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Abstract
An ocean surface model for synthetic IR/visible imaging applications has been developed at GTRI based upon the Pierson-Moskowitz wave spectrum. The model calculates a 2D grid of height values describing a given snapshot of the sea surface. This surface is a function of wind speed and direction as well as elapsed time into the simulation. The time parameter permits the animation of the sea surface during a simulated movie sequence. Sea signatures are calculated using a combination of models and tools: the GTRI IR signature code GTSIG is used to predict sea temperatures; LOWTRAN7 is used to construct tables of sky radiances; the Fresnel equations are used to construct tables of sea reflectance. These signature components are combined during image rendering with a ray-tracing approach the provides the total radiance (emitted and reflected) from the ocean surface arriving at each sensor image pixel. This ocean model has been integrated into a complete image rendering system called GTRENDER, and is available for use in GTRI applications such as the GTSIMS family of missile simulations.
© (1993) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Albert D. Sheffer, Albert D. Sheffer, J. Michael Cathcart, J. Michael Cathcart, John M. Stewart, John M. Stewart, } "Ocean background model for scene simulation", Proc. SPIE 1938, Recent Advances in Sensors, Radiometric Calibration, and Processing of Remotely Sensed Data, (15 November 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.161559; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.161559
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