23 July 1993 Optical frequency conversion in organic and inorganic crystals and thin films
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Proceedings Volume 1983, 16th Congress of the International Commission for Optics: Optics as a Key to High Technology; 19839A (1993) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2308753
Event: 16th Congress of the International Commission for Optics: Optics as a Key to High Technology, 1993, Budapest, Hungary
Abstract
Advances in photonic systems rely heavily on the development of nonlinear processing devices for manipulating laser beams and complex coherent wavefronts. A highly non linear response, even to low level illuminations, converts photorefractive materials into attractive candidates for numerous applications A wide variety of prototype operations has already been demonstrated, including holographic storage, image amplification and correlation, two-dimensional logic, associative recall, phase locking of laser diodes and laser beam steering. This paper provides a review of theoretical and recent experimental work on the photorefractive effect in view of practical applications in the field of non-linear optics. The following section briefly reviews the physics of the photorefractive effect. Section 3 is devoted to the basic wave mixing configurations in photorefractives and to the related amplification and phase conjugation phenomena. Finally, section 4 provides a brief overview of some of the most promising applications in the field of nonlinear beam and image processing.
© (1993) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Peter Günter, Peter Günter, } "Optical frequency conversion in organic and inorganic crystals and thin films", Proc. SPIE 1983, 16th Congress of the International Commission for Optics: Optics as a Key to High Technology, 19839A (23 July 1993); doi: 10.1117/12.2308753; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2308753
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