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31 May 1994 Design and operation of the infrared chopping secondary mirror for the Keck 10-m telescope
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Abstract
In mid 1992 an actively controlled infrared (IR) reflecting secondary mirror was installed on the W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope, currently the world's largest telescope. This 0.5 m gold plated beryllium mirror is capable of extremely precise motions over a wide range of amplitude and frequency and is used to perform spatial chopping, a technique commonly used in IR astronomy to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of weak IR sources. This paper describes the design, implementation and test of the mirror drive and control system. Details of the drive electromechanical design and operations on its unique adaptive control system. Test data from laboratory and telescope operation are also shown and discussed, and a short video of the mirror system in operation (shown at the conference) is also briefly described.
© (1994) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Kenneth R. Lorell, Jean-Noel Aubrun, Gregory J. Feher, Ernesto O. Perez, Donald F. Zacharie, and Paul J. Reshatoff Jr. "Design and operation of the infrared chopping secondary mirror for the Keck 10-m telescope", Proc. SPIE 2201, Adaptive Optics in Astronomy, (31 May 1994); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.176117
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