15 June 1994 Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX): planned observation of midwave infrared (MWIR) below the horizon (BTH) and low above the horizon (LATH) backgrounds
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Abstract
Two Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) experiments are designed to obtain data on terrestrial (below the horizon) and low earthlimb (low above the horizon, below 40 km tangent height) backgrounds as seen from the MSX satellite by the SPIRIT III cryogenically cooled radiometer and UVISI imagers. The radiometer will provide data in two mid-wave infrared bands with a spatial resolution of 90 (mu) radians and a temporal resolution of at least 13.9 msec to characterize the small scale structure of the backgrounds and their global distribution. Other instruments aboard the MSX payload will provide supporting spectral and spatial imagery data for correlating phenomenological behavior in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared regions of the spectrum. The 18-month duration of the cryogen will afford many opportunities to sample the backgrounds during all seasons, cloud and terrain conditions, day, night, and terminator scenes, and a variety of solar scattering angles. Automated data processing will provide rapid reduction of the data and generate products characterizing the scene content and statistical distribution of radiance as well as indices for cataloging the data.
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Harold A. B. Gardiner, Robert R. O'Neil, William Grieder, Richard Hegblom, Charles H. Humphrey, Alvin T. Stair, William O. Gallery, Robert D. Sears, "Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX): planned observation of midwave infrared (MWIR) below the horizon (BTH) and low above the horizon (LATH) backgrounds", Proc. SPIE 2223, Characterization and Propagation of Sources and Backgrounds, (15 June 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.177920; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.177920
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KEYWORDS
Mid-IR

Radiometry

Imaging systems

Infrared imaging

Satellite imaging

Satellites

Spatial resolution

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