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15 June 1994 Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite ultraviolet and visible background phenomenology
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Abstract
The Midcourse Space Experiment Satellite (MSX) has a suite of ultraviolet and visible imaging spectrographs and imagers that cover the wavelength range from 110 to 900 nm. The versatile pointing capability of the satellite allows observations in the earth limb and below the horizon with observations during the day and night. The wavelength resolution (1 - 3 nm) for the spectrographs and high spatial resolution in the filtered imagers allows experiments covering a multitude of background phenomenology issues. Experiments are designed to look at ultraviolet through the visible clutter issues for many different scene conditions in the earth limb and below the horizon. Hyperspectral images of terrain and ocean features for specific locations are in the planning stages specially at specific ground truth locations. Atmospheric emission sources during the day and night in different global locations. Atmospheric emission sources during the day and night in different global locations from the poles to the equator will be observed for both assessment of radiance and clutter issues as well as for input into atmospheric radiance models.
© (1994) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Gerald J. Romick, Donald E. Anderson Jr., James F. Carbary, Larry J. Paxton, Daniel Morrison, and Ching-I. Meng "Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite ultraviolet and visible background phenomenology", Proc. SPIE 2223, Characterization and Propagation of Sources and Backgrounds, (15 June 1994); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.177910
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