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19 October 1994 Cryogenic bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements at 10.6 um on contaminated mirrors for the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite program
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Abstract
Effects of contaminants on optical surfaces is a continuing concern for space-based systems-- especially those containing cryogenic optical systems. Effects of contaminant films on mirror bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) were studied in support of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Satellite that is scheduled for launch in 1994. This study present experimental results of infrared scattering measurements made on cryogenic optical surfaces that are cooled to temperatures as low as 15 K. At this temperature gases such as nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water will condense. These are the gases of most concern to the MSX Program. BRDF studies have been completed to determine infrared (10.5 micrometers ) effects as functions of film thickness and angle of reflection for these gases. It has been found that the change in mirror performance depends on contaminant film species, thickness, wavelength, and mirror temperature. Results of the infrared scatter data are compared with previously obtained visible scatter data.
© (1994) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Bryan L. Seiber, Robert J. Bryson, and Bob E. Wood "Cryogenic bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements at 10.6 um on contaminated mirrors for the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite program", Proc. SPIE 2261, Optical System Contamination: Effects, Measurements, and Control IV, (19 October 1994); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.190138
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