30 September 1994 Design for a ground-based spectrometric facility for measuring the terrestrial dayglow from the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared
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Abstract
In a companion paper (Swift and Torr), we demonstrate a capability to observe thermospheric dayglow emissions from the ground using a novel photometric approach. In this paper we incorporate the principles of the technique into the design of a spectrometric facility capable of measuring the dayglow spectrum over the wavelength range 300 to 880 m at < 0.5 nm resolution with photometric like sensitivity, namely 50 counts/R at 300 nm and approximately 200 counts/R at 600 nm. the design is an all refractive f/1.4 distortion correctable grating spectrograph capable of operating over a full diurnal cycle with high sensitivity. The field of view is 14 degree(s). The instrument has a dynamic range of 108, no moving parts except shutters, and a noise equivalent detection threshold of approximately 15R in the daytime and 0.01 to 0.1 R at night. The design comprises four spectrometric modules which provide simultaneous measurements of emissions in the 300 - 900 nm range. A 1024 X 1024 CCD is used for the detector. The facility should provide simultaneous measurements from the ground of the rich spectral content of the daytime mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere.
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Douglas G. Torr, Douglas G. Torr, Chen Feng, Chen Feng, Wesley R. Swift, Wesley R. Swift, Muamer Zukic, Muamer Zukic, } "Design for a ground-based spectrometric facility for measuring the terrestrial dayglow from the near-ultraviolet to the near-infrared", Proc. SPIE 2266, Optical Spectroscopic Techniques and Instrumentation for Atmospheric and Space Research, (30 September 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.187555; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.187555
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