17 February 1995 Laser metrology evolution: past, present, and future
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Proceedings Volume 2333, Fifth International Symposium on Display Holography; (1995) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.201906
Event: Display Holography: Fifth International Symposium, 1994, Lake Forest, IL, United States
Abstract
There is no doubt that the laser has in many ways far surpassed even the wildest ideas of what it could do. Our most important unit, the meter, is practically defined as a certain number of lightwaves, and now with the use of the laser interferometer we measure with the light waves directly in the workshop. The laser has also made possible a new definition of the meter -- the distance that light travels in a certain fraction of a second. Thus, time and space have become connected in a way I am sure Einstein should have appreciated. With the laser we can produce ultrashort pulses made up of only a few waves. And with these pulses we can make measurements down to micrometers. Soon, even this new definition of the meter can be used directly in the workshops.
© (1995) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Nils H. Abramson, Nils H. Abramson, "Laser metrology evolution: past, present, and future", Proc. SPIE 2333, Fifth International Symposium on Display Holography, (17 February 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.201906; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.201906
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