9 September 1994 Thin-gate dielectric films grown in N<sub>2</sub>O and O<sub>2</sub> using rapid thermal oxidation
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Abstract
Much work has been performed in the past few years on N2O oxidation as a method to produce nitrided gate dielectrics. Most of this work has centered on processes in horizontal or vertical batch furnaces operating at atmospheric pressure. Obtaining good oxide thickness uniformity, both within the wafer and across the batch, has proven to be more difficult for N2O oxidation than for O2 oxidation. As the gate dielectric thickness requirement approaches 50 angstrom or less, uniformity of the dielectric thickness becomes more critical. For thinner oxides, single wafer rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) may be the only feasible oxidation technique. N2O oxidation development in an integrated gate stack cluster tool has been underway for more than one year. This oxidation has been performed under a variety of process conditions on both conventional silicon and SOI wafers. Recent results indicate that oxides grown in N2O at lower pressures (approximately 100 Torr) have better electrical characteristics and thickness uniformity than oxides grown in N2O at atmospheric pressure. Reliability test indicate that oxides grown in N2O have consistently better breakdown field, charge to breakdown, and time dependent dielectric breakdown than oxides grown in O2 under identical conditions; however, unstressed N2O oxides have higher interface trap densities than similar O2 oxides.
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John M. Grant, John M. Grant, Tzu Yen Hsieh, Tzu Yen Hsieh, Victoria L. Shannon, Victoria L. Shannon, } "Thin-gate dielectric films grown in N<sub>2</sub>O and O<sub>2</sub> using rapid thermal oxidation", Proc. SPIE 2335, Microelectronics Technology and Process Integration, (9 September 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.186063; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.186063
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