Translator Disclaimer
Paper
31 May 1995 Using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy to detect hazardous air pollutants
Author Affiliations +
Proceedings Volume 2365, Optical Sensing for Environmental and Process Monitoring; (1995) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.210827
Event: Optical Sensing for Environmental and Process Monitoring, 1994, McLean, VA, United States
Abstract
A pulsed-molecular-beam Fabry-Perot cavity Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer developed at NIST has demonstrated sensitivities for many polar gas- phase molecular species in the low parts per million (ppm) to parts per billion (ppb) range. The highest sensitivity is obtained using neon or argon carrier gas but nitrogen or air can also be used, with some loss in sensitivity (up to 100 times) due to the less efficient rotational and vibrational cooling in the molecular beam with diatomic gases. The minimum detectable concentrations for several representative compounds are provided. These include acetaldehyde, acrolein, propionaldhyde, benzaldehyde, p- tolualdehyde, methanol, SO2, propene, methyl t-butyl ether, ethyl t-butyl ether, and others. Considerable attention has been given to making the instrument versatile and user friendly. The instrument is computer controlled using standard GPIB interfaces and several graphical interfaces under the CPLUPLU operating system.
© (1995) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
F. J. Lovas, W. Pereyra, Richard D. Suenram, Gerald T. Fraser, J.-U. Grabow, and Angela R. Hight Walker "Using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy to detect hazardous air pollutants", Proc. SPIE 2365, Optical Sensing for Environmental and Process Monitoring, (31 May 1995); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.210827
PROCEEDINGS
12 PAGES


SHARE
Advertisement
Advertisement
Back to Top