3 April 1995 Transcutaneous analyte measuring method (TAMM): a reflective, noninvasive, near-infrared blood chemistry analyzer
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Abstract
TAMM for Transcutaneous Analyte Measuring Method is a near infrared spectroscopic technique for the noninvasive measurement of human blood chemistry. A near infrared indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) photodiode array spectrometer has been developed and tested on over 1,000 patients as a part of an SBIR program sponsored by the Naval Medical Research and Development Command. Nine (9) blood analytes have been measured and evaluated during pre-clinical testing: sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, bicarbonate, BUN, glucose, hematocrit and hemoglobin. A reflective rather than a transmissive invasive approach to measurement has been taken to avoid variations resulting from skin color and sensor positioning. The current status of the instrumentation, neural network pattern recognition algorithms and test results will be discussed.
© (1995) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Kenneth J. Schlager, Timothy L. Ruchti, "Transcutaneous analyte measuring method (TAMM): a reflective, noninvasive, near-infrared blood chemistry analyzer", Proc. SPIE 2386, Ultrasensitive Instrumentation for DNA Sequencing and Biochemical Diagnostics, (3 April 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.206017; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.206017
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