12 May 1995 Application of the advanced communications technology satellite for teleradiology and telemedicine
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
The authors have an in-kind grant from NASA to investigate the application of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to teleradiology and telemedicine using the JPL developed ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) uplink. This experiment involves the transmission of medical imagery (CT, MR, CR, US and digitized radiographs including mammograms), between the ACTS/AMT and the University of Washington. This is accomplished by locating the AMT experiment van in various locations throughout Washington state, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Hawaii. The medical images are transmitted from the ACTS to the downlink at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, consisting of AMT equipment and the high burst rate-link evaluation terminal (HBR-LET). These images are then routed from LeRC to the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSoM) through the Internet and public switched Integrated Serviced Digital Network (ISDN). Once images arrive in the UW Radiology Department, they are reviewed using both video monitor softcopy and laser-printed hardcopy. Compressed video teleconferencing and transmission of real-time ultrasound video between the AMT van and the UWSoM are also tested. Image quality comparisons are made using both subjective diagnostic criteria and quantitative engineering analysis. Evaluation is performed during various weather conditions (including rain to assess rain fade compensation algorithms). Compression techniques also are tested to evaluate their effects on image quality, allowing further evaluation of portable teleradiology/telemedicine at lower data rates and providing useful information for additional applications (e.g., smaller remote units, shipboard, emergency disaster, etc.). The medical images received at the UWSoM over the ACTS are directly evaluated against the original digital images. The project demonstrates that a portable satellite-land connection can provide subspecialty consultation and education for rural and remote areas. The experiment is divided into three phases. Using the ACTS fixed-hopping beam, phase one involves testing connection of the AMT to medical imaging equipment and image transmission in various climates in western and eastern Washington state. The second phase involves satellite relay transmissions between the Inmarsat satellite and the ACTS/AMT through a ground station in Hawaii for medical imagery originating from either Okinawa, Japan or Kwajalein, in the Pacific. The third phase involves extended use of the ACTS steerable beam in Washington state, Idaho, Montanan and Oregon.
© (1995) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Brent K. Stewart, Brent K. Stewart, Stephen J. Carter, Stephen J. Carter, Alan H. Rowberg, Alan H. Rowberg, } "Application of the advanced communications technology satellite for teleradiology and telemedicine", Proc. SPIE 2435, Medical Imaging 1995: PACS Design and Evaluation: Engineering and Clinical Issues, (12 May 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.208776; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.208776
PROCEEDINGS
10 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top