30 May 1995 Modifying police department training programs to accommodate the use of less-than-lethal technologies
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Abstract
The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), in response to the National Institute of Justice, less-than-lethal (LTL) technologies program, has proposed to help police departments modify their training programs to meet the challenge of training officers to use new LTL technologies. Work performed by the INEL in the development of an air bag restraint for patrol vehicles and in a technologies assessment for vehicle interdiction technologies has given laboratory researchers a better understanding of the law enforcement environment and has enabled them to evaluate potential training aids to help police departments use new technolgies and teach their officers to most efficiently and effectively use them. With the developemnt of LTL technologies as options in law enforcement comes the need for departments to adapt their current departmental training and refresher training programs to incorporate alternative weapons. This adaptation may include modifying decision making and skills training to teach officers when and how to effectively use new technologies. By assessing current programs and reviewing the training programs of other succesful agencies, a department may be able to easily adapt their current program to meet the needs of training officers in the use of LTL technologies. As litigation drove the need to develop new alternative weapons for law enforcement, it will also shape the application of the technologies when used in the field. If used incorrectly they may be ineffective, dangerous to the user, or cause more physical damage than intended. Because technology is rapidly changing, law enforcement training must keep up with the changes and meet their needs.
© (1995) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Trudy K. Overlin, Donna J. Marts, "Modifying police department training programs to accommodate the use of less-than-lethal technologies", Proc. SPIE 2497, Public Safety/Law Enforcement Technology, (30 May 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.210483; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.210483
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