1 May 1996 Satellite teleradiology test bed for digital mammography
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Abstract
Teleradiology offers significant improvement in efficiency and patient compliance over current practices in traditional film/screen-based diagnosis. The increasing number of women who need to be screened for breast cancer, including those in remote rural regions, make the advantages of teleradiology especially attractive for digital mammography. At the same time, the size and resolution of digital mammograms are among the most challenging to support in a cost effective teleradiology system. This paper will describe a teleradiology architecture developed for use with digital mammography by GE Corporate Research and Development in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital under National Cancer Institute (NCI/NIH) grant number R01 CA60246-01. The testbed architecture is based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard, created by the American College of Radiology and National Electrical Manufacturers Association. The testbed uses several Sun workstations running SunOS, which emulate a rural examination facility connected to a central diagnostic facility, and uses a TCP-based DICOM application to transfer images over a satellite link. Network performance depends on the product of the bandwidth times the round- trip time. A satellite link has a round trip of 513 milliseconds, making the bandwidth-delay a significant problem. This type of high bandwidth, high delay network is called a Long Fat Network, or LFN. The goal of this project was to quantify the performance of the satellite link, and evaluate the effectiveness of TCP over an LFN. Four workstations have Sun's HSI/S (High Speed Interface) option. Two are connected by a cable, and two are connected through a satellite link. Both interfaces have the same T1 bandwidth (1.544 Megabits per second). The only difference was the round trip time. Even with large window buffers, the time to transfer a file over the satellite link was significantly longer, due to the bandwidth-delay. To compensate for this, TCP extensions for LFNs such as the Window Scaling Option (described in RFC1323) were necessary to optimize the use of the link. A high level analysis of throughput, with and without these TCP extensions, will be discussed. Recommendations will be made as to the critical areas for future work.
© (1996) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Bruce G. Barnett, Kathryn Eike Dudding, Aiman Albert Abdel-Malek, Robert J. Mitchell, "Satellite teleradiology test bed for digital mammography", Proc. SPIE 2711, Medical Imaging 1996: PACS Design and Evaluation: Engineering and Clinical Issues, (1 May 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.239263; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.239263
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KEYWORDS
Satellites

Teleradiology

Diagnostics

Receivers

Sun

Digital mammography

Mammography

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