4 November 1996 Consumer acceptance of MPEG2 video at 3.0 to 8.3 Mb/s
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Proceedings Volume 2917, Broadband Access Systems; (1996) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.257359
Event: Photonics East '96, 1996, Boston, MA, United States
Abstract
Consumers judged the quality of video images that had been compressed by an MPEG2 codec at the bit rates 3.0, 3.9, 5.3, and 8.3 Mb/s. The judgments were made in a standard testing laboratory. VHS and simulated cable analog systems also processed the same scenes for comparison. This study asked: (1) At what bit rate does MPEG2 video equal or exceed the quality of competing technologies such as cable TV and VHS? Answer: 3 Mb/s. (2) How much more are consumers willing to pay for MPEG2 compared to what they currently pay for cable TV? Answer $1 - $2. The answers to both questions come with many caveats. Further results: MPEG2 was rated higher than MPEG1 at the same bit rate, even without the use of 'B frames.' The rating difference was about a dollar. MPEG2 at 3.0 Mb/s is rated the same as MPEG1 at 3.9 Mb/s. Subjective quality improves only slowly as bit rate increases from 3.0 to 8.3 Mb/s. MPEG2 at 8.3 Mb/s was rated the same as the original, uncompressed signal. Individual test scenes were rated differently, independent of the coding system.
© (1996) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Gregory W. Cermak, Gregory W. Cermak, Sandra K. Teare, Sandra K. Teare, Ernest P. Tweedy, Ernest P. Tweedy, James C. Stoddard, James C. Stoddard, } "Consumer acceptance of MPEG2 video at 3.0 to 8.3 Mb/s", Proc. SPIE 2917, Broadband Access Systems, (4 November 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.257359; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.257359
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