8 November 1996 Fluorimetric detection of water pollutants with a fiber-coupled solid state UV laser
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Proceedings Volume 2965, ALT '96 International Symposium on Laser Methods for Biomedical Applications; (1996); doi: 10.1117/12.257364
Event: ALT '96 International Symposium: Laser Methods for Biomedical Applications, 1996, Heraklion, Crete, Greece
Abstract
Aromatic hydrocarbons are important and dangerous pollutants of the aquatic environment. With the method of laser-induced fluorescence it is possible to detect Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) as well as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) sensitively. The detection of these molecules by a continuously working in-situ method is achieved by combining LIF with fiberoptic guidance of light. We presence results on the detection of BTX and PAH by excitation with 266 nm and 355 nm radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser especially developed for sensor applications. The system is operated with thermoelectric cooling and battery supply independent of any installations is projected. The laser delivers pulses of 7 ns/140 (mu) J in the UV at a repetition rate of 100 Hz. Using time-resolved and spectrally-resolved detection of the fluorescence signal, the system delivers information that can be used to discriminate between BTX and PAH-molecules. We have also performed extensive investigations of the influence of scattering particles on the sensor signal. This led to specific optimizations of the sensor-head for different applications.
© (1996) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Peter Karlitschek, Uwe Buenting, T. Northemann, Georg Hillrichs, "Fluorimetric detection of water pollutants with a fiber-coupled solid state UV laser", Proc. SPIE 2965, ALT '96 International Symposium on Laser Methods for Biomedical Applications, (8 November 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.257364; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.257364
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KEYWORDS
Luminescence

Molecules

Sensors

Ultraviolet radiation

Fiber optics

Particles

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