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22 May 1997 Coherent and noncoherent low-power diodes in clinical practice
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Abstract
Clinical efficacy of the low power laser (LPL) in medical treatments is still not well established. In a double blind, placebo controlled study, we tried to find out first which type of LPL is more efficient, and second if coherence is an important character for clinical efficacy. We treated 1228 patients having different rheumatic diseases, with low power diode, used as follows: A group: IR coherent diode, continuous emission, 3 mW power; B group: IR coherent diode, pulsed emission, output power about 3 mW; C group: IR noncoherent diode continuous emission 9 mW power; D group: both IR diode lasers (continuous or pulsed) and HeNe laser, continuous emission, 2 mW power; E group: placebo laser as control group. The energy dose used for every group was the same, as well as the clinical protocols. The positive results were: 66.16% for A group; 64.06% for B group; 48.87% for C group; 76.66% for D group, and 39.07% for E group. Finally, we showed that LPL is really efficient in the treatment of some rheumatic diseases, especially when red and IR diode laser were used in combination. The type of emission (continuous or pulsed) is not important, but coherence is obviously necessary for clinical efficacy.
© (1997) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Ciprian Antipa, Mihail-Lucian Pascu, Viorica Stanciulescu, Mihaela Vlaiculescu, Elena Ionescu, and Daniel Bordea "Coherent and noncoherent low-power diodes in clinical practice", Proc. SPIE 2981, Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedical Science and Clinical Applications, (22 May 1997); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.274310
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