18 August 1997 Accurate manipulation using laser technology
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Proceedings Volume 3097, Lasers in Material Processing; (1997); doi: 10.1117/12.281087
Event: Lasers and Optics in Manufacturing III, 1997, Munich, Germany
Abstract
In the industrial production of electrical, optical, and micro-mechanical components, progress in miniaturization requires improved adjusting techniques. Sub-micrometer accuracy adjustment must be obtained within seconds, and the accuracy should be stable over many years. All methods that are presently applied for manipulation in sub-micron dimensions are cumbersome, time-consuming, and tedious, and require expensive equipment. A novel method, laser adjustment, is being explored in which permanent deformation of thin metal sheets are obtained by using thermo-mechanical stresses that occur when the sheets are locally heated using short, intense laser pulses. Manipulation along several degrees of freedom can be realized by both out-of-plane and in-plane laser adjustment or a combination thereof. Within the Brite-Euram project AMULET this new automated micro- manufacturing technology for mass production is developed in order to assemble components where tolerance conditions and accessibility are beyond human capability.
© (1997) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Willem Hoving, "Accurate manipulation using laser technology", Proc. SPIE 3097, Lasers in Material Processing, (18 August 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.281087; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.281087
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Actuators

Pulsed laser operation

Bridges

Metals

Laser applications

Laser welding

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