18 August 1997 Use of high-power diode lasers for hardening and thermal conduction welding of metals
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Proceedings Volume 3097, Lasers in Material Processing; (1997) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.281121
Event: Lasers and Optics in Manufacturing III, 1997, Munich, Germany
Abstract
CO2 and Nd:YAG high power lasers have become established as machining tools in industrial manufacturing over the last few years. The most important advantages compared to conventional processing techniques lie in the absence of forces introduced by the laser into the workpiece and in the simple arid highly accurate control in terms ofpositioning and timing making the laser a universally applicable, wear-free and extremely flexible tool /1,2/. The laser can be utilised costeffectively in numerous manufacturing processes but there are also further applications for the laser which produce excellent results from a technical point of view, but are not justified in terms of cost. The extensive use of lasers, particularly in small companies and workshops, is hindered by two main reasons: the complexity and size ofthe laser source and plant and the high investment costs /3/. A new generation of lasers, the high power diode lasers (HDL), combines high performance with a compact design, making the laser a cheap and easy to use tool with many applications /3,4,5,6/. In the diode laser, the laser beam is generated by a microelectronic diode which transforms electrical energy directly into laser energy. Diode lasers with low power outputs have, for some time, been making their mark in our everyday lives: they are used in CD players, laser printers and scanners at cash tills. Modern telecommunications would be impossible without these lasers which enable information to be transmitted in the form oflight impulses through optical fibres. They can also be found in compact precision measurement instrumentation - range fmders, interferometers and pollutant analysis devices /3,6/. In the field of material processing, the first applications ofthe laser, such as for soldering, inscribing, surface hardening and plastic or heat conduction welding, will exceed the limits ofthe relatively low performance output currently available. The diode laser has a shorter wavelength than the CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers making it more favourable in terms ofthe absorption behaviour ofthe laser beam - an advantage that will soon have a significant effect on the range of its applications.
© (1997) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Fritz Klocke, Axel Demmer, A. Zaboklicki, "Use of high-power diode lasers for hardening and thermal conduction welding of metals", Proc. SPIE 3097, Lasers in Material Processing, (18 August 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.281121; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.281121
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