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17 September 1997 Optical metrology of difficult-to-access surfaces: micromeasurement of the inner profiles of diamond wiring dies
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Proceedings Volume 3098, Optical Inspection and Micromeasurements II; (1997) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.281201
Event: Lasers and Optics in Manufacturing III, 1997, Munich, Germany
Abstract
The surface metrology market today is moving towards non- contact modular computer-controlled systems for measuring and analyzing roughness, contour and topography. Since most of these systems require a great accessibility to the surface to be measured they can not be used for the metrology of surfaces with intricate geometries, difficult access and small dimensions. In this paper a new instrument concept for measuring the profiles of such difficult-to- access surfaces is demonstrated. Two different prototypes based on the confocal microscopy arrangement have been developed. A visible laser beam is focused with a high numerical aperture optical system onto the component surface that has to be measured. Depending on the prototype configuration, either the retroscattered or the reflected light signals are measured with a CCD array and analyzed with an image data processing algorithm. As an example of the application of these confocal prototypes, over 20 diamond wiring dies with different sizes and geometries have been measured and their inner profiles displayed and analyzed. All the results obtained show that the measurement method is robust enough to provide sub-micron repeatability and in the worst case the precision achieved is one order to magnitude better than the manufacturing tolerances of wiring dies.
© (1997) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Ferran Laguarta, I. Al-Khatib, Cristina Cadevall, and Jesus Caum "Optical metrology of difficult-to-access surfaces: micromeasurement of the inner profiles of diamond wiring dies", Proc. SPIE 3098, Optical Inspection and Micromeasurements II, (17 September 1997); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.281201
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