1 October 1997 Instrumentation for the New Millennium Program Mars Microprobe Project: design approach and test results
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Abstract
The Mars Microprobe Project provides a unique opportunity to validate instrumentation technologies for performing relevant science experiments on the Martian surface and at a depth of up to two meters. The instrumentation package of the Mars Microprobe includes a meteorological instrument for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature, accelerometers to measure the atmospheric drag on the probe aeroshell during descent, accelerometers for measuring the forces on the probe at impact, temperature sensors in the penetrator to measure the soil thermal conductivity at depth, and an experiment to collect a small sample of the Martian regolith and determine if water is present in the sample. These instruments have been designed to withstand the deceleration forces resulting from the impact and penetration of the probe into the Martian surface and to function in the harsh temperature environment beneath the surface. Results from the design and environmental test of these instruments are presented.
© (1997) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Randel C. Blue, "Instrumentation for the New Millennium Program Mars Microprobe Project: design approach and test results", Proc. SPIE 3116, Small Spacecraft, Space Environments, and Instrumentation Technologies, (1 October 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.293325; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.293325
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KEYWORDS
Mars

Sensors

Microcontrollers

Electronics

Atmospheric sensing

Temperature sensors

Temperature metrology

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